Interview: Professor David Vaux talks about Statistics and Publishing in Big Journals   Recently updated !

At the second annual Motor Impairment Program meeting held at Neuroscience Research Australia at the end of last year, we were lucky to have guest speaker, Professor David Vaux from the Walter & Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research (Melbourne, Australia) come up to talk to us about some general problems […]

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The use and abuse of brain stimulation 2

Brain zapping, or non-invasive brain stimulation, in all its forms, has hit the mainstream.  You can even watch a YouTube video about how to build your very own not-approved-for-human-use transcranial magnetic stimulation machine!  Light-heartedness aside, the therapeutic benefits of brain stimulation are regularly highlighted in the news, and the number […]


Interview: Professor Simon Gandevia talks about Ageing

In a recent interview, Simon Gandevia talks about a recently published review article by Stephen Lord, Kim Delbaere and himself which examined how motor impairments become more prevalent with ageing and how careful physiological measurement and appropriate interventions offer a way to maximise health across the life span. PUBLICATION: Lord SR, […]

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2015 Highlights from the Motor Impairment Group at NeuRA

Members of the Motor Impairment Research Program conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess whether step training can improve physical and neuropsychological measures associated with falls in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). 50 people with MS participated in the trial in which intervention group participants (n = 28) performed step […]


Even motoneurons need a break! 4

Motoneurons are the final common pathway for every movement and muscle contraction. Located in the spinal cord, these neurons constantly receive and integrate thousands of tiny electrical signals from various parts of the central and peripheral nervous system. The end result: an action potential that travels down their axon and […]

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Redesigning the Rubber Hand Illusion 6

Proprioception is the sense of the body’s own actions in space. Proprioception is disrupted in many clinical conditions such as dystonia, Parkinson’s disease and stroke. This disruption affects the ability of these individuals to produce “normal” movements. For years different paradigms have been used by researchers to examine proprioception. Dr. Lee […]


Interview: Professor Simon Gandevia talks about Motor Impairment

Ahead of the second annual Motor Impairment meeting, Simon Gandevia, Deputy Director of Neuroscience Research Australia, talks about Motor Impairment; what it is and what he and his colleagues at NeuRA are investigating as part of the NHMRC-funded program grant.    

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Documenting Motor Impairment and the risk of falling with ageing and in clinical groups

Ageing decreases exercise performance and is frequently accompanied by reductions in cognitive performance. Deterioration in the physiological capacity to stand, walk and exercise leads to falling over.  This can signify a serious deterioration in sensorimotor control.  In the elderly, falling leads to serious morbidity and mortality with major costs to society.  […]


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One session of strength training makes the spinal cord more excitable 5

Strength training consists of repetitive high-force muscle contractions.  Strength training for four weeks improves maximal strength (Carroll et al. 2011).  These strength gains are primarily the consequence of changes in the nervous system and are not simply due to an increase in muscle size (e.g., Weier et al. 2012).  In […]