Simon Gandevia


How can you make your muscle grow longer?

Across the animal kingdom, muscles adapt to the exercise that they perform.  They can do this by changing their intrinsic capacity to generate force as well as changing their actual size, both the cross-sectional area of the muscle and the length of the muscle (e.g. Goldspink, 1985; Lynn & Morgan, […]


Benefits of very short high-intensity training

The personal health and economic burden of physical inactivity is receiving justifiably growing recognition.  This burden may be greatest for the elderly where the gap between recommended levels of physical activity and actual activity is most pronounced.  This gap was recently highlighted in a national analysis of Australian health (Australia’s […]


Neuroimaging the brain areas activated by muscle and cutaneous afferents

Inputs from specialised cutaneous and muscle afferents are crucial for tactile manipulation and accurate movement and postural control.  Both sets of afferents project to the cerebral cortex and contribute to proprioceptive senses (e.g. Proske & Gandevia, 2012).  We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the cortical activation produced by cutaneous […]


The human upper airway and its neuromechanical behaviour

Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common disorder which is linked to increased incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction and heart failure (for review see Jordan et al 2014).  However, the fundamental neuromotor control of the upper airway is poorly understood, perhaps because of its structural and neural complexity.  Recently a series […]