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Interview: Professor Lorimer Moseley talks about science communication 1

Scientists publish their most important findings in scientific journals. But who reads those journals? Almost exclusively other scientists. That means that the vast majority of people, who fund the research through their taxes, will never hear about the results even though they might be important for them. Professor Lorimer Moseley […]


Interview: Professor Simon Gandevia talks about Ageing

In a recent interview, Simon Gandevia talks about a recently published review article by Stephen Lord, Kim Delbaere and himself which examined how motor impairments become more prevalent with ageing and how careful physiological measurement and appropriate interventions offer a way to maximise health across the life span. PUBLICATION: Lord SR, […]


2015 Highlights from the Motor Impairment Group at NeuRA

Members of the Motor Impairment Research Program conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess whether step training can improve physical and neuropsychological measures associated with falls in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). 50 people with MS participated in the trial in which intervention group participants (n = 28) performed step […]


Interview: Professor Simon Gandevia talks about Motor Impairment

Ahead of the second annual Motor Impairment meeting, Simon Gandevia, Deputy Director of Neuroscience Research Australia, talks about Motor Impairment; what it is and what he and his colleagues at NeuRA are investigating as part of the NHMRC-funded program grant.    


One session of strength training makes the spinal cord more excitable 6

Strength training consists of repetitive high-force muscle contractions.  Strength training for four weeks improves maximal strength (Carroll et al. 2011).  These strength gains are primarily the consequence of changes in the nervous system and are not simply due to an increase in muscle size (e.g., Weier et al. 2012).  In […]


Is the voluntary control of breathing the same as normal involuntary breathing?

Most of the time, our breathing is controlled involuntarily so that we don’t need to consciously think about breathing in and out all the time (for reviews, see Feldman & Del Negro, 2006; Richter & Smith, 2014). However, there are many instances where we need to voluntarily control how fast […]


Increasing gravity reveals the mechanism of human tremor

Everyone experiences some degree of involuntary motion when trying to keep their hand still. Known as physiological tremor, the underlying mechanisms have been debated for over a century. Two explanations, neural and mechanical, are generally offered. The neural theory suggests that involuntary movements directly reflect oscillations in the control signal […]


Breathing: a constant requirement, but is respiratory muscle activation adaptable?

Over 15 000 times every day we draw air into the lungs by expansion of the chest wall and abdomen; we breathe. This movement occurs by activation of inspiratory muscles from electrical signals from the brain to the respiratory motoneurones in the spinal cord. There are many inspiratory muscles that can […]


Serotonin, Spasticity and Spinal Cord Injury (The Three S’s)

Immediately following a spinal cord injury (SCI) patients enter a state of areflexia and muscle weakness that is gradually replaced by the recovery of neuronal and network excitability leading to improvements in residual motor function over time as well as to the development of spasticity (i.e. involuntary muscle spasms). Spasticity […]


Interview with Professor Simon Gandevia on motor impairment

Siobhan Moylan, a science and media communicator at Neuroscience Research Australia, recently conducted this insightful interview with Professor Simon Gandevia. In the interview, Professor Gandevia talks at length about motor impairment, which is the focus of a recent NHMRC Program Grant entitled ‘Motor Impairment: basic and applied human neurophysiology’.