Pain & motor control


Translating walking parameters into meaningful biomarkers for benchmarking pathological movement behaviour   Recently updated !

Walking is regulated and coordinated through complex control mechanisms within the human sensory motor system, allowing individuals to adapt to both internal and external challenges and perturbations (Full et al., 2002). During this regulation to achieve stable walking, natural fluctuations (i.e. movement variability) are present between strides in both the […]


Joint position sense is unaffected during persistent experimental muscle pain

Our ability to sense the position of our body, known as proprioception, is fundamental for controlling how we move and interact during daily activities (Proske and Gandevia, 2012). People who have persistent pain (i.e., pain that lasts for more than three months) find it difficult to sense the position of […]


A single bout of exercise reduces pain sensitivity in people with Parkinson’s disease

Pain is one of the most troubling impairments of Parkinson’s disease, with up to 85% of people affected (Broen et al., 2012). While exercise has many benefits in assisting people with Parkinson’s disease to optimise their health, balance, strength and mobility, there is limited research exploring the benefits of exercise […]


Aerobic exercise reduces pressure pain more than heat pain in healthy adults 2

Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is a reduction in pain that occurs during or following a single bout of exercise (Naugle et al, 2012). When researchers test exercise-induced hypoalgesia, they briefly induce painful stimuli to research participants to see if pain sensitivity changes after exercise. Different types of painful stimuli have been used […]


Motor Impairment Blog’s most popular posts

Over the past 4.5 years, researchers from all over the world have written non-technical summaries on their research for the Motor Impairment Blog. Consequently, the Blog contains a rich archive of information on topics such as muscle strength and weakness, falls and balance, sensation, pain, motor control, and research methods. […]


Pain education increases pain thresholds after exercise

In people with chronic pain, the interactions between exercise and pain are complex. On one hand, regular exercise may be one of the most effective treatments because it consistently improves pain, function and quality of life (Geneen et al., 2017). On the other hand, a single session of exercise, such […]


Can’t run from the past: previous injuries increase risk of leg injury

If someone has suffered a leg injury in the past, they are at an increased risk of having that particular injury again in the future (Murphy et al. 2003). Oftentimes, this second injury is worse than the first. Knowing this, physiotherapists often design rehabilitation programs that target that particular body […]


Treatment options for musculoskeletal pain: an overview of current evidence 2

Musculoskeletal pain is the most common cause of disability globally (Vos et al. 2013). It is managed in primary care by a plethora of treatment options, such as self-management advice and education, analgesics, corticosteroid injections, exercise therapy, complementary therapies, and psychosocial interventions. Research suggests that localised musculoskeletal pain frequently coexists in more […]


Exercise reduces pain through a peripheral mechanism in healthy adults 1

In healthy adults, it is well demonstrated that a single bout of exercise can acutely reduce pain (Naugle et al., 2012), a phenomenon known as exercise-induced hypoalgesia. However, the mechanisms of pain reduction after exercise are not clear. The methods commonly used to study pain responses after exercise in humans […]